Godly Play

What are we here for?

We meet here to talk about Godly Play, to share what it’s all about and to discuss how to do it better.

The weekly blog posts are designed to help Sunday school teachers prepare for their Godly Play lessons, and the individual pages (see the tabs at the top of this page) share information about how we do Godly Play at First Baptist Church, Greenville, SC.

We’d love to hear from teachers everywhere, not just the ones at our church! We hope you’ll join our circle and share your ideas!

What Godly Play is Not

Godly Play is quite different from the traditional model in which the teacher tells the children what they need to know. Godly Play is not about things that are that simple. It is not just about learning lessons or keeping children entertained. It is about locating each lesson in the whole system of Christian language and involving the creative process to discover the depths of meaning in them.

What is Godly Play?

According to the Godly Play Foundation, Godly Play is a creative and imaginative approach to Christian nurture.

Godly Play is about understanding how each of the stories of God’s people connects with the child’s own experience and relationship with God.

Godly Play respects the innate spirituality of children and encourages curiosity and imagination in experiencing the mystery and joy of God.

Read more about Godly Play here.

How do we do Godly Play at First Baptist Greenville?

Christians of many different denominations use Godly Play and probably do it differently, even within the same denomination. In this blog, I describe Godly Play by sharing the way our church does it. That doesn’t mean that it’s the best way or the prescribed way, or the only way, of course, but it’s the way that suits us best.

The Psalms

Welcome to The Psalms, the Godly Play story scheduled for this Sunday, November 10, based on the book of Psalms.

If you’re teaching at FBG, I’ve emailed you the story script, which includes the first part of the David story from last week, found in the pink Enrichment Presentations for Fall, p.81. If you are not a Sunday school teacher at First Baptist Greenville and would like a copy of the Psalms story script, just email me and I’d be happy to send it to you. Or join the blog mailing list and it will be sent to you, along with 9 other Godly Play style story scripts that I’ve written and am happy to share.

In the script, we use the first part of the David story and then explore the idea that the Psalms writers went to God with all kinds of different emotions. We discuss how we can pray to God when we feel afraid, happy, angry, peaceful, sad or worried, and joyful, or when we feel sorry for what we’ve done. With each different emotion, we share a Psalm (or 2 or 3) that the Psalm writers experienced and shared with God.

To share the Psalms, we’re going to use a beautiful book, Psalms for Young Children, written by Marie-Helene Delval and illustrated by Arno. In this book, Ms. Delval has adapted the psalms for children in a way that is so easy to read and to relate to. I’ve purchased one for each class (except for 3rd grade, which already had a copy.) You’ll find it in your story basket, which I left near your Bible bookcase. I put it there to remind you (and me) that you’ll need the Bible Bookcase as you tell the story. (You’ll take the Psalms book out and place it on the underlay in part of the story.
By the way, the Psalms in this book are shared in order (by number.) They’re so short that I think you’ll find it hard to stop reading them!

 To help the children follow along with the different emotions we’ll be discussing I’ve made emotion cards for each class.

Older children might enjoy comparing the Psalms as written in the Bible with Marie Helene Delval’s adaptations. They might like making their own adaptations as well. You might want to choose one Psalm to focus on, like #23 or 139.

The wondering questions are included in the story script.

Ideas for Your Give a Gift to God time:

1. Writing our own Psalms–Have children pick an emotion that they sometimes feel and write God a prayer or song that they might pray or sing while feeling that way.

 

2. Write a psalm showing how you feel today. Draw a picture to go with it.
Or read a psalm to a friend that shows how you feel.

 

3. Illustrate a Psalm. Choose a psalm and illustrate it, like Arno did in Psalms for Young Children. (Any Psalm would be good. If you want, you could choose the psalm for the children, like #23 or 139.)

4. Write a psalm together as a class, and then let the children illustrate it individually or together.
5. Work out a tune that fits a psalm that you like. Or write your own to sing.
6. Make instruments to play while singing a psalm. You can find directions to make a simple tambourine here, and a lyre here.

7. For more ideas, find my Pinterest page on the Psalms here.

Enjoy! 🙂